Veeam Availability Console and standalone computers

Veeam Availability Console has been designed for multiple use cases, and one of them is to manage large fleets of computers. But what about those standalone machines we have lying around? It could be the last physical server we have in the datacenter, or a laptop of a consultant that is always travelling around. How can we deal with those? I involved my family’s computers to find out.

I wrote another book! This time, about Veeam Availabiliy Console

If you are subscribed to this blog via RSS, you may have noticed that May and June have been two empty months in terms of writing, and tobe honest the entire 2019 has not been so prolific as usual. This is because I worked, and I’m still working, on some large projects that took a big chunk of my time. I’m still writing these days, but the outcome is coming out in big pieces instead of weekly posts. The first one is this, about Veeam Availability Console.

Learning how to use terraform in vCloud Director

Lately, I took the decision to do not have anymore a physical lab, even if it was already hosted and managed at a service provider, but to completely nest it inside a vCloud Director tenancy. But while I was planning the rebuild operation, I also decided it was time to make its creation process as automated as possible, and while doing so, I learned a bit about how to use Terraform.

Automatic restore of multiple machines from Veeam to AWS

A couple of weeks ago I presented to a customer Veeam's integration with AWS services, specifically the Direct Restore to EC2 feature. He was really interested, but he also immediately thought about possible large scenarios of this feature. This solution is not a Disaster Recovery technology, since a machine is not replicated into EC2, ready to be powered on, but it's rather a backup that is uploaded and then imported into EC2. But still, massive migrations or the creation of dev/test environments from a production copy were really nice use cases.