Tunnel all your remote connections through ssh with a linux jumpbox

As many guys working in IT, I have my own lab. I usually prefer to use my own lab as the degree of freedom I can experience cannot be compared with a corporate lab. It often happens that some specific configurations (one for all, my vCloud Director environment) are better looking in my own lab than any other place, and so I also use my lab to show those technologies to partners and customers. This is easy when I’m at home, but I may be in an hotel room, in a conference room at the customer’s site, or another different place, and in many of these situations it may happen (and it happened enough times to justify this little project) that the connections to my lab are blocked by a firewall or another device. I have two ways to connect to my lab: an RDP to a jumpbox machine, published on a different port that the usual TCP/3389, and an ipsec vpn concentrator. In one case, none of them was possible at a customer, so we ended up with a colleague of mine tethering from his phone. I decided it was time to develop a better solution that was able to work in almost any situation. And my solution involves the always amazing SSH.

Seeding Veeam Cloud Connect – Part 1: Backup copy jobs

Veeam Cloud Connect is a great technology that allows end users to add to a local protection also an offsite location where they can store backup copies or replicated virtual machines. As not every customer has a fast internet connection, Veeam Cloud Connect implements multiple data reduction tecniques to improve data transfer, but especially the initial full backup or full replica can be slow and painful for some customers with really small internet connection. That’s why seeding is such an important option in Veeam Cloud Connect.
In this three series blog posts, you will learn how to use Veeam Cloud Connect. In Part 1, how to seed a regular backup copy job.

Load balancing services with AWS Route53 DNS health checks

DNS is a great technology that everyone uses over internet. How would you reach a given website if you weren’t able to solve its name to the IP address? Would you memorize the public IP addresses of any website you want to reach? No, and with IPv6 coming in the future, DNS will become even more important for internet consumption. But DNS has one drawback: its records are usually static, and if a platform is dynamic and spawn/removes instances on the fly, it needs to have a way to modify the DNS records that are published, so that a non-reachable instances is not even listed.