Veeam Extract Utility, quick restores without the Veeam server

One of the biggest misconceptions about Veeam Backup & Replication, often fueled by competitors, is that it requires the complete server installation in order to run restores. So, this becomes a Single Point of Failure, just like many other solutions from competitors. This is completely untrue: there are two main features in Veeam that make restores possible even without the server installation.

Has Flash PCIe market reached the peak?

Whenever there is a new idea, a new movement, a new music style, any new thing in any aspect of life, we can observe more or less the same timelines during its lifecylce. These days, I’m starting to see the same traits in the Flash PCIe market.
At the beginning there is the explosion of a new market. Someone launches a new technology (or it can be a new music genre, this example works in different areas), and suddenly a completely new market has born. They had an idea, they identified a new need from customers, or the same need that could have been solved in a different and better way. In this case, the bottleneck created by old bus connectors like SATA and SAS were preventing the complete use of insanely fast Flash memories. By connecting the same memories directly into the PCIe bus, that bottleneck was removed and customer could experience better performances.

Can you clone a VM replicated by Veeam?

Veeam Backup & Replication has always had since its first version the possibility to replicate VMs, together with the backup capabilities. Once a VM is replicated in a secondary site, it could become a great resource for additional activities: from automated recovery tests (called SureReplica in Veeam) to become also the source for cloning activities. Data are already locally saved, there is no need to retrieve anything else from the source site, so any operation is quick an easy. Are there any informations we should be aware of in doing these operations? Let’s find it out.

Hello Veeam Cloud Connect!

When we at Veeam talk about data protection best practices, we recommend that customers follow the “3-2-1 rule”: 3 copies of any data, on 2 different media, with at least 1 copy in a remote location. This is an effective strategy to greatly enhance the availability of their precious data, but requires at least two sites. With Veeam Cloud Connect, there is no need to own the second site; the same solution can be offered by a service provider, so a customer does not incur capital expenses to build and maintain an additional infrastructure, but instead can quickly and easily consume a service with a “pay as you go” model.
This is what Veeam Cloud Connect makes possible, and it’s the meaning of its name: a connection between Veeam customers and service providers to send data offsite easily and in a secure way.

Veeam Backup & Replication 7.0 Patch 4: VSAN support!

Veeam just released the new and latest patch for Backup & Replication 7.0, numbered Patch 4. The new patch can be installed on any previous version of 7.0 release, since as usual the patch is cumulative. The final build number after the upgrade will be now 7.0.0.871.
There are as usual many improvements and fixes, and two big enhancements. The first one is the added support for Microsoft SQL 2014, but for sure the biggest news is with no doubt the support for VMware Virtual SAN, unofficially shorten VSAN by many.

An introduction to Microsoft Scale Out File Server

Last week I attended the E2EVC Conference in Brussels. It’s an independent conference about virtualization, filled with technical sessions about many different technologies and platforms: there were some VMware sessions, but the majority of them were about Citrix and Microsoft. It was a great opportunity for me as a “VMware guy” to learn about “the other sides” of the virtualization world. Among the available sessions, Microsoft Scale Out File Server (SOFS) seemed from the beginning an interesting topic; I went to listen to two sessions and I was finally able to get a better knowledge of SOFS.

See you at HP Discover in Las Vegas?

HP Discover is the main worldwide event organized by HP every year. There is a US event and an EMEA one. In the past, I’ve attended a couple of times the EMEA version.
This year it’s going to be different for me. I joined Veeam Software few months ago, and Veeam is going to be, like in previous years, a sponsor of HP Discover. This means first of all I will attend this time also the US version of the event for the first time, and I will also have two presentations.

Me too!

Whenever a new technology is launched, there is (almost everytime) a clear inventor of it, the one who first had the idea in his/her mind and was able to make it something real. As soon as others discover and study this technology, they take the original idea and use it for their own purposes, with or without improving it. Sometimes those second comers add the same feature into their own feature list, in a way that can be called “me too”. Is there any value in a “me too” situation?